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The 7 Layers of Division in Black America

dynastylnoire:

redbellied-piranha:

hussieologist:

redbellied-piranha:

kingjaffejoffer:

borednschooled:

There’s a great wish in the African American community for a wonderful utopia known as UNITY. The word brings about images of 70′s era movies where everyone picks their blow-out Afros, slaps high-fives and echoes “Right on!” in unison.

This reality was lived out by our parents but now the word has become pure fantasy. A fellow AA writer and myself discussed this unity thing and came up with 7 layers of division that keeps black unity a myth. This list may not be exclusive to blacks but it plagues us and keeps us separated in a major way.

The 7 Layers of Division in Black America:

Layer 1 – Bourgie vs. Ghetto
Middle/upper class vs. lower class for those confused by the derogatory terms. These two classes of people don’t necessarily hate one another but cannot coexist due to different outlooks and prejudice towards one another. So how would you go about unifying them?

Layer 2 – American vs. Immigrant
African Americans’ “us versus them” mentality, the effort to stay “the most screwed over minority” and the immigrants who segregate themselves so as not to be confused with native-born blacks is an old and hard issue that will not go away easily.

Layer 3 – Church vs. Cynics
Many of us grew up in the black church only to leave and become cynical. I won’t get into the reasoning for this (there’s a full article on it for those who need clarification). The cynics will never agree with those who quote scripture because they do not respect their stance on anything.

Layer 4 – Racially Scarred vs. Racially Ambiguous
When you grew up being called a nigger and being denied based on your color it is a different world than growing up where everyone is cordial and the “n-word” is something you hear about versus actually hearing it. One says “Don’t trust them” and the other says “Get over it!” Each thinks the other is hopeless.

Layer 5 – Light vs. Dark
Every culture of color has had this issue it seems. The light is right attitude of our ancestors has left a nasty and bitter taste in some of our mouths but sadly many black people still follow it.

Layer 6 – Huey vs. Uncle Ruckus
Uncle Ruckus hates his blackness and hates everything to do with it. Huey loves the skin he’s in and cannot fathom how a black man could hate himself. Like their namesakes from Aaron McGruder’s “Boondocks” there are many who cannot see eye to eye when it comes to blackness.

Layer 7 – Men vs. Women
Many of us are in great relationships with black men/women but sadly enough, we don’t talk about that them as much as we talk about the jerks (guilty) from our past. Men are stereotyped as uneducated jailbirds and women as bitchy co-eds, the Cosby dynamic being laughably inaccurate.

So will black people ever “unify” and appear as together as our fellow minorities? I don’t think so and after seeing the 7 layers that we would have to overcome, you can understand why.

wow this is painfully true

hussieologist
look
We talk about #2 weekly tho lol
redbellied-piranha

You think the list is complete?

There’s at least a couple more layers to this.

Jury Frees Man Charged With Shooting at Cops Who Raided Wrong House

priceofliberty:

Cops raid the wrong house, shots are fired…You know where this is going, right? It’s another innocent person plugged by police officers who can’t read street addresses, or another sleepy homeowner charged with murder for shooting an intruder who happened to be a government employee with a bad sense of direction.

But this story has a happy-ish ending. Nobody was injured. And the man who fired at the late-night wrong-way raiders was ultimately cleared by jurors who thought the police behaved poorly.

From KHON2:

Brandon remembers, “We ran upstairs very quickly … she saw guys in all black from right here in this window looking down.” Watson said he couldn’t immediately find his cell phone to call 911 so he ran downstairs with his firearm and stood at the foot of the stairs, shielded by a wall.

"I announced myself, ‘Who is that? Who is that? I have a gun.’ And as soon as I said that, two red laser beams were on my chest," Watson said. "so I looked at the red laser beams on my chest, and I fired a warning shot."

A single shot through a window, and then Watson ran to get help from his neighbor across the street, a Virginia State Police deputy.

As I came out of the house … they said, ‘stop,’ and I said, ‘Who?’ They then said, ‘Who just fired the shot out the back window?’ I said I did … and I was holding a gun, and they said, ‘put down the gun.’”

Watson dropped his handgun and said he received shocking news.

"They said, ‘we just got news you shot at an officer.’ I said, ‘An officer? Nobody came to my door. What do you mean an officer? I didn’t know there were any officers in my backyard,’" he told WAVY.com.

Then he learned the dark figures in his backyard were Portsmouth police officers who had not announced themselves.

Watson was charged with misdemeanor reckless handling of a firearm for the shot he fired, after a warning, at assailants who hadn’t identified themselves.

His first trial, before a judge ended in a guilty verdict. He appealed.

The second trial ended in a mistrial.

The third trial took place before a jury, which found Brandon Watson not guilty.

Jurors believed Watson showed restraint by firing one shot, and that police had no business raiding the wrong address (they counted down houses along the block rather than check number plates). They also thought the laser sight indicators on Watson’s chest proved the cops were full of shit when they claimed to have their weapons aimed at the ground.

"The police kept saying they had their weapons pointed at the ground at all times. At the same time, they said they were using their TAC lights on the gun to illuminate whatever they were looking at," Barnes said. "You can’t be doing both at the same time, that’s contradictory."

WAVY asked Chief Hargis if a light could have gone into the window.

"Yes, but I don’t think it was there for any long period of time," he said.

We asked him if the red lights appearing on Watson’s chest were possible.

"It is possible, sure," he replied.

The incident could have ended a lot worse. Cory Maye, whose case was highlighted by Radley Balko in Reason, spent 10 years in prison for killing a police officer during a wrong house raid. Kathryn Johnston was among those killed for trying to defend their homes.

Watson essentially lost a year of his life. But he’s free. When cops screw up, it’s rare for the subject of the screwup to come out the other end so relatively unscathed.

Maybe public attitudes toward police raids are changing. Earlier this year, a Texas grand jury declined to indict Henry McGee who killed a police officer during a raid actually targeted at his house.

I don’t know how he isn’t dead?!?! Shooting at the cops usually ends up very poorly!

beautiesofafrique:

The Queen of Sheba (Queen Makeda) 

The Queen of Sheba - an mysterious woman of power - is immortalised in the world’s great religious works, among them the Hebrew Bible and the Muslim Koran. She also appears in Turkish and Persian painting, in Kabbalistic treatises, and in medieval Christian mystical works, where she is viewed as the embodiment of Divine Wisdom and a foreteller of the cult of the Holy Cross. In Africa and Arabia her tale is still told to this day and, indeed, her tale has been told and retold in many lands for nearly 3,000 years.

The Queen of Sheba was a monarch of the ancient kingdom of Sheba and is referred to in Yemenite and Ethiopian history, the Bible, the Qur’an, Yoruba customary tradition, and Josephus. 

The Queen of Sheba has been called a variety of names by different peoples in different times. To King Solomon of Israel she was the Queen of Sheba. In Islamic tradition she was called Bilkis, Bilqis, Balqis, Balquis, Bilkish or Bilqays by the Arabs, who say she came from the city of Sheba, also called Mareb, in Yemen or Arabia Felix. The Roman historian Josephus calls her Nicaule. The Luhya of Kenya call her Nakuti, while the Ethiopian people claim her as Makeda. She is said to have been born some time in the 10th century BC. One of the beliefs is that she loved a king named Hemant. Traditionally her lineage was part of the Ethiopian dynasty established in 1370 BC by Za Besi Angabo, which lasted 350 years; her grandfather and father were the last two rulers of this dynasty. According to the Kebra Negast, her mother was known as Queen Ismeni, and in 1005 BC, Makeda’s father appointed her as his successor from his deathbed. 

In the Hebrew Bible, a tradition of the progenitors of nations is preserved in Genesis 10. In Genesis 10:7 there is a reference to Sheba, the son of Raamah, the son of Cush, the son of Ham, son of Noah. In Genesis 10:26-29 there is a reference to another person named Sheba, listed along with Almodad, Sheleph, Hazarmaveth, Jerah, Hadoram, Uzal, Diklah, Obal, Abimael, Ophir, Havilah and Jobab as the descendants of Joktan, the son of Eber, the son of Shelah, the son of Arphaxad, the descendant of Shem, another son of Noah

In Ancient times Ethiopia was also known as Nubia, Kush, Aksum, Abyssinia and Sheba. One thousand years before Christ, Ethiopia was ruled by a line of virgin queens. The one whose story has survived into our time was known as Makeda, “the Queen of Sheba.” Her remarkable tradition was recorded in the Kebra Nagast, or the Book of the Glory of the Kings [of Ethiopia], has been held in the highest esteem and honour throughout the length and breadth of Abyssinia for a thousand years at least, and even to-day it is believed by every educated man in that country to contain the true history of the origin of the Solomonic line of kings in Ethiopia.

At this time, Ethiopia was second only to Egypt in power and fame. Hence, King Solomon was enthralled by Ethiopia’s beautiful people, rich history, deep spiritual tradition and wealth. He was especially interested in engaging in commerce with one of Queen Makeda’s subjects, an important merchant by the name of Tamrin. She gave the king 120 talents of gold, and of spices very great store and precious stones; there came no more abundance of spices as these which the Queen of Sheba gave to King Solomon.” (Kings 10:10)

"I am black but comely,

O ye daughters of Jerusalem,

As the tents of Kedar,

As the curtains of Solomon,

Look not upon me because I am black

Because the sun hath scorched me.”

(Song of Solomon)

Read more/ Sources: 1| 2| 3

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